heyteenbookshey
elloellenoh:

disabilityinkidlit:

goldenheartedrose:

dysfunctionalqueer:

goldenheartedrose:

weneeddiversebooks:

justsitstill:

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, try Marcelo in the  Real World by Francesco X. Stork because both are fabulous stories about autism spectrum boys finding their way in the world.

I don’t agree with how the characters in these books are described as “autism spectrum boys.” A more inclusive description would be, “boys with autism spectrum disorder.” Generally, when referring to an individual with an exceptionality or special needs, don’t say “_____ boy/girl/person/etc.”, say “boy/girl/person/etc. with _____.” The former description erases the fact that the person is a unique individual on their own; instead they become their exceptionality first and then a person after.
Moreover, one of the reasons I love Marcelo in the Real World so much is because it’s not a book that features a character with ASD and then proceeds to point at the fact that he has autism for the entire book. When you read the book, it’s not like you’re left with the impression that all Marcelo has to offer to the story is his ASD. No- this story is about Marcelo, who has many facets to his personhood, trying to come to terms with complicated moral questions.
I just think it’s important to think about the words we use and how we use them.
But, regardless, I’m happy that the We Need Diverse Books team is bringing this wonderful novel to the attention of more people! Seriously, it’s a must read!

Good point! Thank you for clarifying!

I’m going to disagree 100% with justsitstill. The autistic community in general prefers to not use person-first language in referring to ourselves and each other. We say “autistic person”, and we don’t say “person with autism”. Autism colors our lives in a way that can’t be easily separated. That doesn’t mean that it’s the only thing about us, but if you wouldn’t say “person with queerness/gayness” or “person with womanhood” or “person with blondeness”, don’t use “person with autism” either. Side note: You will still find many educators, especially in the fields of teaching/childcare/social work/psychology will still use “person with autism” or “person with x disability” instead of “autistic” or “disabled”. But that doesn’t make them right. Here are some links:http://autisticadvocacy.org/identity-first-language/http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=identity+first+language+autism+community&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ei=zX7aU56-A5CzyASrsIKgBg&ved=0CBsQgQMwAAhttp://yesthattoo.blogspot.com/p/dont-call-me-person-with-autism.html

Also The Curious Incident of the Boy and Nighttime is a terrible ableist book about autistic people. I personally find it appaling that it’s considered a good representation of an autistic character. 

Yes, it really really is. However, I think the fact that the book is popular is why it’s being used as a launching off point to recommend the second book, which is a lot better (so I’ve heard from other autistic folks).

Ah! I see that someone else has also made this point already.
With regards to Marcelo in the Real World, s.e. smith reviewed this novel for Disability in Kidlit last year. Conclusion: mostly a thumbs up!
I personally reviewed it as well and was somewhat less enthused.
Both these reviews are by autistic people, as is Disability in Kidlit policy. 

The dialogue that is happening is so important that we have to repost it. Thank you all for contributing to this discussion so that we all can learn from it.

elloellenoh:

disabilityinkidlit:

goldenheartedrose:

dysfunctionalqueer:

goldenheartedrose:

weneeddiversebooks:

justsitstill:

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, try Marcelo in the  Real World by Francesco X. Stork because both are fabulous stories about autism spectrum boys finding their way in the world.

I don’t agree with how the characters in these books are described as “autism spectrum boys.” A more inclusive description would be, “boys with autism spectrum disorder.” Generally, when referring to an individual with an exceptionality or special needs, don’t say “_____ boy/girl/person/etc.”, say “boy/girl/person/etc. with _____.” The former description erases the fact that the person is a unique individual on their own; instead they become their exceptionality first and then a person after.

Moreover, one of the reasons I love Marcelo in the Real World so much is because it’s not a book that features a character with ASD and then proceeds to point at the fact that he has autism for the entire book. When you read the book, it’s not like you’re left with the impression that all Marcelo has to offer to the story is his ASD. No- this story is about Marcelo, who has many facets to his personhood, trying to come to terms with complicated moral questions.

I just think it’s important to think about the words we use and how we use them.

But, regardless, I’m happy that the We Need Diverse Books team is bringing this wonderful novel to the attention of more people! Seriously, it’s a must read!

Good point! Thank you for clarifying!

I’m going to disagree 100% with justsitstill. The autistic community in general prefers to not use person-first language in referring to ourselves and each other. We say “autistic person”, and we don’t say “person with autism”. Autism colors our lives in a way that can’t be easily separated. That doesn’t mean that it’s the only thing about us, but if you wouldn’t say “person with queerness/gayness” or “person with womanhood” or “person with blondeness”, don’t use “person with autism” either.

Side note: You will still find many educators, especially in the fields of teaching/childcare/social work/psychology will still use “person with autism” or “person with x disability” instead of “autistic” or “disabled”. But that doesn’t make them right.

Here are some links:

http://autisticadvocacy.org/identity-first-language/

http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=identity+first+language+autism+community&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ei=zX7aU56-A5CzyASrsIKgBg&ved=0CBsQgQMwAA

http://yesthattoo.blogspot.com/p/dont-call-me-person-with-autism.html

Also The Curious Incident of the Boy and Nighttime is a terrible ableist book about autistic people. I personally find it appaling that it’s considered a good representation of an autistic character. 

Yes, it really really is. However, I think the fact that the book is popular is why it’s being used as a launching off point to recommend the second book, which is a lot better (so I’ve heard from other autistic folks).

Ah! I see that someone else has also made this point already.

With regards to Marcelo in the Real World, s.e. smith reviewed this novel for Disability in Kidlit last year. Conclusion: mostly a thumbs up!

I personally reviewed it as well and was somewhat less enthused.

Both these reviews are by autistic people, as is Disability in Kidlit policy. 

The dialogue that is happening is so important that we have to repost it. Thank you all for contributing to this discussion so that we all can learn from it.

onedhqcentral

Campbell (Cam) Hoyt has been battling Ependymoma, brain and spine cancer, since August, 20, 2009. She was just 3 years old when she was diagnosed. Cam has now been placed on hospice care and has one simple wish. To meet One Direction. There is no known cure for multiple recurrent anaplastic ependymoma. Earlier this summer, Campbell had major disease progression and the Hoyt’s insurance company was refusing treatment for Cam. On July 16, through  the power of social media and the generosity and tenaciousness of the local community,  over $47,000 was raised in just one day and due in part to the awareness and pressure generated, the insurance company agreed to cover treatment for Cam. Campbell has now been placed on hospice care and has one simple wish. This is what her mother posted yesterday:

Ok folks. Miss Cam has asked for one thing for the last three years- to meet 1D, in particular Harry Styles. We’ve tried every way we have had available to us. Time is short. If you know anyone who can help… We just are looking for a personalized video message to Cam fro…m the boys. We’ve given up on a meet and greet. But to hear Harry and Niall and Louis and Zayn and Liam say “Halo Campbell. We hear you’re not feeling well… But we wanted you to know we think you’re beautiful”. and sing her fav 1D song ….that would bring the biggest smile to her face. So, Team Campbell -GO!

(x)

Heart breaking